Camping List For Family

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If you’ve never been camping before, or if you’ve never been camping with kids, getting ready for the trip can be a little scary. What things do you need? And what’s the way to help keep the costs under control? There’s a lot you need to be careful about. The family camping list provided below is an excellent place to start. But before you look at the list, here are some pointers to help you figure out what your family needs to camp.

Backyard Test

You may detect whether anything is missing from your camping kit by giving it a try in the backyard. In addition, it’s a terrific practice ground for “real” camping that youngsters may use to prepare for future adventures. Make sure to fit it in before the’real’ thing, if possible.

The Perfect Tent

To determine which tent would be ideal for our family, we rented two different models from friends. This experience also taught me the need to invest in an air mattress if I didn’t want to wake up with excruciating back agony every morning. We’ve compiled a list of must-haves for family camping, so you may find it useful.

Transport And Camping Location

How about you—do you like camping more in a vehicle, an RV, or a backpack? What kind of weather, hot or cold, do you plan to camp in? What you carry along depends on the answers to these questions.

Reusable Gear

You may be able to reuse some of the gear you used on previous camping trips. It’s more cost-effective to reuse certain goods here and there than to purchase brand-new ones.

Keeping Essentials

Preparing for a camping trip might seem like a lot of work if you’ve never done it before, or at certainly not with children. What are the must-haves, and what is possible to live without? Can anything be done to assist bring down the prices? Use this basic family camping packing list as a starting point. But before you glance at the list, we’ve got some advice to help you figure out what your family needs for a camping trip.

You may be able to reuse some of the gear you used on previous camping trips.  It’s more cost-effective to reuse certain goods here and there than to purchase brand new

Reserve A Campsite

It’s time to start planning a camping trip. It’s a good idea to reserve a campsite in advance to ensure you have one available. Leaving on Friday morning (or during the week) can help you beat the traffic and have more time to set up camp before nightfall

Campsite Guidelines Review

Have your pals over. It’s a lot of fun to go camping with the kids. However, when you go camping with some other family or take your kids’ friends along, it’s much easier to keep everyone entertained and active. Comply with the park or campground’s guidelines regarding party size. Most websites and phone numbers will provide up-to-date information on the number of individuals who may camp or assemble there.

Checklist

Getting the necessary equipment ready. Use this camping checklist to ensure you have everything you need on your trip. Before setting off, ensure your canvas, stove, matches/lighters, and lamps are in good working order.

Meal Plan

Get the meal ready. Food isn’t included in the checklist; you’ll need to make your provisions. Here’s a suggestion: plan your meals in advance by writing down what you’ll have for breakfast, lunch, and supper. Then, perform as much prep work as possible at home, such as marinating the meats, cutting the veggies, and wrapping the potato in foil. When you get to camp, you’ll be quite appreciative.

To avoid forgetting any of the fixings or serving utensils, etc., lay out each meal’s worth of food and plan how you’ll serve it before packing the cooler.

Camping Essentials

These are the things that you absolutely cannot live without. Get money via borrowing or investing, whichever is most appropriate.

  • Tent

Grass- or tarp-covering

Cushions for sleeping on or air mattresses

  • Child’s portable bed for sleeping
  • Children’s favorite sleep accessories, including pillows
  • Kit for basic medical intervention
  • Toiletries (for each person in the family)
  • As in, bathroom tissue
  • Outdoors Towel (one per person)
  • Fire starters, tinder, kindling, and wood for such fire pit (one flashlight or headlamp per person).
  • Lighter fluid or matches
  • Repellent to insects

Camping Attire and Equipment for the Family

In the event of vehicle camping, a hard-sided suitcase (of a more manageable size, suitable for carry-on) that complements the totes and coolers is a must. Some people find that higher-capacity backpacks are better suited to harsher environments. Whatever helps you the most is the best option.

Accessories

The fact that you can have a good time in the great outdoors with little preparation is a big draw for many campers. It’s good to have a lovely place to camp, but it’s much better if it’s also handy and cozy. In addition, each parent is aware that children always need a few extras. Therefore, there are some creature comforts to consider bringing along on your camping trip.

Remember to include a high-quality light for everyone when preparing for a family camping trip.

A rucksack for day trips and other brief excursions from camp.

If your child sleeps better with a comforter or stuffed animal, bring it along. Getting rid of your favorite comfort food or blanket is not the right move right now.

Our Final Thoughts

Underpreparing when you’re about to go camping with your family is one of the worst mistakes you could make. Especially when you’re about to head into the wild. Your first priority should always be ensuring all the essentials are ready before leaving the house. That’s not all, though. You also have to do enough research to familiarize yourself with the area and the rules that apply to it.

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